Struck by Covid

What a crappy thing to get. Splitting headache (no amount of paracetamol helps), shivers, unbelievable fatigue, neurological symptoms (I’m too emotional), body temp of over 38C at all times. To sum up – hell.

Take it seriously people, I’m forced to take off a week of work. This is not fun when you are a contractor

C# 9.0

Developing Desktop applications with .NET 5.0

Around and About .NET World

We know that .NET 5.0 makes it possible to develop WPF and Windows Forms applications. However, at the time of writing, Visual Studio templates haven’t been updated to new target framework: desktop applications are still created using .NET Core 3.1. So, for example, the project file for a WPF application is the following:

However, we can easily update it to use .NET 5.0. We just need to change Sdk attribute (line 1) and the TargetFramework tag (line 5):

In particular, we don’t have anymore an Sdk that relates to desktop applications. Instead, we have a target framework moniker (TFM) that is OS-specific, net5.0-windows. This is because the standard net5.0 moniker only includes technologies that work cross-platform. Specifying an OS-specific TFM makes APIs that are specific to an operating system available to ours applications (in our case, desktop applications on Windows). Of course, OS-specific TFMs also inherit every API available…

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gRPC pub/sub demo

Sacha's Blog

Its been a while since I’ve posted here and also written an article. But I took some time last night to create an article about gRPC. Here is an abstract about the article

So if you have been around a while you will have undoubtedly come across the need to perform some sort of remote procedure call. There are many frameworks that allow this, WebApi, WCF, just about any REST Api you can think of, Service Stack etc etc

This is all fairly standard stuff we call a remote systems method with some parameters (or not) and get a response (or not)

Those of you that have also used things like WCF will recall that WCF also supported Duplex channels, where the server side code was capable of calling clients back on a callback channel. This is quite useful for things like notifications/price updates things like that.

Now WCF is…

View original post 112 more words

Automating creating NuGet packages with MSBuild

Code, the Universe and everything...

NuGet is a great way of shipping projects. You work on a project, you publish a package and it is immediately available to, literally, millions of developers. Creating a package consists of a few steps like authoring a .nuspec file, creating a folder structure, copying the right files to the right folders/subfolders and calling the nuget pack command. While the steps are not complicated they are error prone. I learnt this lesson when I shipped the first alpha versions of some of my NuGet packages. What happened was that I would create a package and then I would start feeling some doubts – did I really build the project before copying the files? did I copy the Release and not the Debug version? did I sign the file? And then people started using my packages and started asking (among other things) for a version that would work on other versions…

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Blazor WebAssembly Rest Client

ChristianFindlay.com

Blazor is Microsoft’s latest Single Page Application (SPA) framework, which is C# based and renders to the browser HTML DOM. Blazor comes in two flavors: server-side and client-side rendering. This article focuses on client-side rendering and explains how to use RestClient.Net to make calls to a RESTful API. Blazor WebAssembly uses C# compiled for WebAssembly (Wasm).

Blazor lets you build interactive web UIs using C# instead of JavaScript. Blazor apps are composed of reusable web UI components implemented using C#, HTML, and CSS. Both client and server code is written in C#, allowing you to share code and libraries.

https://dotnet.microsoft.com/apps/aspnet/web-apps/blazor

If you haven’t heard of Blazor yet, now would be a good time to start doing some research. Front-end development has been primarily dominated by JavaScript and related technologies like TypeScript for a long time. C# developers often need to switch between JavaScript and C#, even though working in a…

View original post 478 more words

It’s here! Trackable Entities for EF Core!

Tony Sneed's Blog

The idea behind my open source Trackable Entities project is quite simple: track changes to an object graph as you update, add and remove items, then send those changes to a back end service where they can be saved in a single transaction.  It’s an important thing to be able to do, because it’s difficult to wrap multiple round trips in a single transaction without holding locks for a long time.  On the other hand, you could break up related operations into multiple transactions, but then you lose the benefit of atomicity, which enables you to roll back all the changes in a transaction should one of them fail.

To get started with Trackable Entities for Entity Framework Core, download the NuGet package and check out the project repository.  You can also clone the sample applications and follow the instructions.

View original post 1,320 more words

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