Structs, C#7 and Performance Improvement 

C# 7 provides a very powerful feature from the performance standpoint. This feature is returning by ref. Essentially this allows for value types to be returned without having to copy them.

The guidelines are normally that you shouldn’t use a struct with too many fields. Various sources quote various size guidelines. Whenever the struct was over the prescribed size it was recommended that you pass it by reference.

With the new syntax for returning types by reference, it’s now more convenient (no more methods returning via out parameter) to use structs. 

In performance critical scenarios where you need to avoid polluting managed heap with too many Gen #0 objects using structs has now become more natural. In the past dealing with structs was somewhat cumbersome if you dealt with a large number of fields and needed to avoid copying of values. 

I have worked on a large application at McLaren – Telemetry Acquisition System that is supplied to all teams. The performance of the application is very critical as it has to process gigabytes of telemetry data. We have used structs extensively to squeeze out every bit of performance from .NET runtime.

I think it’s my second favourite feature after value tuples.

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Performance Drawbacks of Destructors (Finalizers) in .NET

Every decent .NET developer understands why we need destructors and how they work. In short once you create a method ‘~[ClassName]’ that particular object is placed into finalization queue. Normally those classes that use destructors do also implement the IDisposable interface, and the destructor is there only as a safety net – i.e. in case the developer forgets to call implicitly or explicitly ‘Dispose()’.

However, even though it is clearly stated, not every developer realizes the implications of having to put that object into finalization queue. The popular trail of thought is that if ‘GC.SuppressFinalize()’ there would be no performance penalty, at the end of the day we are removing the object from the finalisation queue and the GC has less work to do.
What many do not realise is that there is only one finalisation queue and if working with multiple threads .NET would have to synchronise the access to that queue somehow. So even when creating objects with destructors from multiple threads, inadvertently we create contention to the finalisation queue and even the creation of such objects could potentially be slower.

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