C# Regrets: Top Worst C# Features

Stumbled upon this article written by no other than Eric Lippert listing the top 10 design faults of C# language. Here is the summary,  the source to the full article is at the bottom. 

#10: The empty statement does nothing for me

Reflects on the fact that lone “;” is a legal statement

#9: Too much equality

There are too many ways check for equality: ==, Equals, ReferenceEquals, CompareTo(…).

From personal experience double.NaN == double.NaN is false but double.NaN.Equals(double.NaN) is true

#8: That operator is shifty

Weirdness around << and >> operators

#7: I’m a proud member of lambda lambda lambda

The way C# 2.0 implements anonymous delegates

#6: Bit twiddling entails parentheses

Flags Enums

#5: Type first, ask questions later

C# borrows the “type first” pattern from C and many of its other successor languages – something I got used to and the “correct” way now seems illogical to me

#4: Flag me down

The fact that you can create invalid enum values and have to manually check for this in the code

#3: I rate plus-plus a minus-minus

++i, i++, i +=1 etc. how much confusion and the pain it caused.

#2 I want to destruct finalizers

Agree with the author that finilisers in C# are symptoms of a bug. Seen it way too many times myself.

#1 You can’t put a tiger in the goldfish tank, but you can try

“array covariance” and how this could lead to run-time exceptions.

Source: http://www.informit.com/articles/article.aspx?p=2425867

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Breaking the CLR Type Safety

Programming fun

As you might have already heard .Net is type safe. Specifically talking CLR provides type safety at runtime, some .Net languages (example: C#) work with CLR to provide type safety at compile time.

So what does the term type safe mean?

Let’s find what Wikipedia says:

In computer science, type safety is the extent to which a programming language discourages or prevents type errors. A type error is erroneous or undesirable program behavior caused by a discrepancy between differing data types for the program’s constants, variables, and methods (functions), e.g., treating an integer (int) as a floating-point number (float). Blah blah blah..

Ok, Now we know that type safety has something to do with preventing the programmer from accessing the type as other than what it is.

Well, C# and CLR are pretty good in this, they work together to push you into the Pit…

View original post 379 more words

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