Creating your own primitive type

It’s a very rare requirement, but sometimes in .NET you have to create your own primitive and make it behave as close as possible to a native CTS (common type system) type. “That shouldn’t be hard” would be your first thought, until you start considering all the scenarios in which it could be used. Continue reading “Creating your own primitive type”

Advertisements

Object Oriented, Test Driven Design in C# and Java: A Practical Example Part #1

Download the code in C#

For a brief overview, please refer to this post.

At this point, many tutorials start by launching into a “Hello, World” style tutorial, with very little practical basis.

HelloWorld

This isn’t the most exciting concept, so let’s try a more practical example. Instead of churning out boring pleasantries, our application is going to do something a bit more interesting…build robots.

Robot

Specifically, our application is going to build awesome robots with big guns.

Ok, let’s get started with a narrative description of what we’re going to do.

“Mechs with Big Guns” is a factory that produces large, robotic vehicles designed to shoot other large, robotic vehicles. Robots are composed of several robotic parts, delivered by suppliers. Parts are loaded into a delivery bay, and are transported by worker drones to various rooms; functional parts such as arms, legs, etc., are dispatched to an assembly room. Guns…

View original post 876 more words

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑