C# POST Request.Form — Chanmingman’s Blog

This article shows you how to POST to a legacy system that using Request.Form to read the POST data. When you click the link at the bottom on this article then you will get the code simulate to the one below. public static void PostData() {     // Create a request using a URL that can […]

C# POST Request.Form — Chanmingman’s Blog

Free e-book: Blazor for ASP.NET Web Forms Developers — ASP.NET Blog

We are thrilled to announce the release of our new e-book: Blazor for ASP.NET Web Forms developers. This book caters specifically to ASP.NET Web Forms developers looking for guidelines. As well as strategies for migrating their existing apps to a modern, open-source, and cross-platform web framework. Blazor E-book for ASP.NET Web Forms Blazor is a…

Free e-book: Blazor for ASP.NET Web Forms Developers — ASP.NET Blog

Blazor WebAssembly Rest Client

ChristianFindlay.com

Blazor is Microsoft’s latest Single Page Application (SPA) framework, which is C# based and renders to the browser HTML DOM. Blazor comes in two flavors: server-side and client-side rendering. This article focuses on client-side rendering and explains how to use RestClient.Net to make calls to a RESTful API. Blazor WebAssembly uses C# compiled for WebAssembly (Wasm).

Blazor lets you build interactive web UIs using C# instead of JavaScript. Blazor apps are composed of reusable web UI components implemented using C#, HTML, and CSS. Both client and server code is written in C#, allowing you to share code and libraries.

https://dotnet.microsoft.com/apps/aspnet/web-apps/blazor

If you haven’t heard of Blazor yet, now would be a good time to start doing some research. Front-end development has been primarily dominated by JavaScript and related technologies like TypeScript for a long time. C# developers often need to switch between JavaScript and C#, even though working in a…

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The Most Easy to Use ViewModeBase

This is something I wrote for an application I’m developing. This is an implementation of INotifyPropertyChanged that requires no backing fields, just call Set(value) or Get(). Internally it uses a dictionary to store the state and even reuses ChangedEventArgs

The source code can be found at:

https://github.com/ebalynn/StatefulViewModel/

Here is the extract from the ViewModel class that does all the heavy lifting:

Continue reading “The Most Easy to Use ViewModeBase”

It’s here! Trackable Entities for EF Core!

Tony Sneed's Blog

The idea behind my open source Trackable Entities project is quite simple: track changes to an object graph as you update, add and remove items, then send those changes to a back end service where they can be saved in a single transaction.  It’s an important thing to be able to do, because it’s difficult to wrap multiple round trips in a single transaction without holding locks for a long time.  On the other hand, you could break up related operations into multiple transactions, but then you lose the benefit of atomicity, which enables you to roll back all the changes in a transaction should one of them fail.

To get started with Trackable Entities for Entity Framework Core, download the NuGet package and check out the project repository.  You can also clone the sample applications and follow the instructions.

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Does the usage of Thread.Sleep(…) warrant making the method Async in an API

Say you are developing an API where you have to use Thread.Sleep(…) since you are working with some device via a COM and you need to wait for the predefined amount of time before you can read from the device and there is no way around it. For example:

Rule in designing APIs in my head, is that you shouldn’t make something Async unless the underlying API(s) you are working with is also Async or uses BeginX EndX, continuations, i.e. something that is already asynchronous. By prematurely making something Async you are making an implementation decision for the consumer of the code. The code provided above doesn’t expose any such API.

Continue reading “Does the usage of Thread.Sleep(…) warrant making the method Async in an API”

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